Article 14 of the Indian Constitution mandates equality among all its citizens. With the interesting interplay of socio-legal forces, Hindus, Muslims and Christians in India are governed by their respective personal laws – which includes property rights as well. As Muslims in the country do not have codified property rights, broadly speaking, there are governed by either of the two schools under the Muslim law – the Hanafi and the Shia. In India, a large number of Muslims are Hanafis or Sunnis. While the Hanafi school recognises only those relatives as heirs whose relation to the deceased is through a male. This includes son’s daughter, son’s son and father’s mother. The Shia school, on the other hand, favours no such discrimination. This means that heirs, who are related to the deceased through a female are also accepted.

A few general rules of inheritance for women are:

The daughter

Under the Muslim law, the laws of inheritance are rather strict. In keeping with its ideology that a woman is half the worth of a man, a son takes double the share of a daughter. But the daughter is the absolute owner of whatever property she inherits. If there is no brother, she gets half a share. It is legally hers to manage, control, and to dispose off according to her wishes.

She is eligible to receive gifts from even from those she would inherit from. This is contradictory because she can inherit only one-third of the man’s share but can get gifts without any hassle.

Till a daughter is not married, she enjoys the right to stay in her parents’ house and seek maintenance. In case of a divorce, charge for maintenance reverts to her parental family after the iddat period (approximately three months) is over. But, if her children are in a position to support her, the responsibility falls on them.

The wife

In the famous Shah Bano case, the Supreme Court had held that in case of a divorce, it is the responsibility of the husband to make reasonable and fair provision to maintain his former wife even after separation under Section 3 (1Ha) of the Muslim Women (Protection of Rights on Divorce) Act, 1986. This period extends beyond iddat as the woman retains control over her goods and properties.

In the event of the death of her husband, a widow gets the one-eighth share (when there are children) but will get one-fourth share (if there are no children). If there is more than one wife, the share may diminish to one-sixteenth.

The mother

A Muslim mother is entitled to inheritance from her children, if they are independent. She is eligible to inherit one-sixth of her dead child’s property if her son is a father as well. In the absence of grandchildren, she would get the one-third share.

What more?

There are other provisions, too, in the law which ensure financial security of a Muslim woman.

 The maher (entitlement)

This is the total money or property that a wife is entitled to get from her husband at the time of marriage. There are two types of maher: prompt and deferred. In the former case, the amount is given to the wife immediately after marriage; in the later, the amount is given to the wife when her marriage has ended, either upon the death of her husband or by divorce.

The wasiyat (will)

A Muslim cannot give away more than one third of his/her total property through a will. In circumstances where there are no heirs in the estate as prescribed by law, the wife may inherit a greater amount by will.

The hiba (gift)

Under the Muslim law, any type of property may be given as a gift. For a gift to be valid, a declaration of the wish to make the gift must be made which should be accepted by the receiver.

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